This very old historical pub on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile is named after William Brodie (1741-1788), a cabinet-maker and Deacon of the guild trades of Edinburgh.

By day he was a good citizen and businessman but at night he maintained a secret life of gambling and mistresses. His dark side meant that he had to take to burglary to pay his debts. He was eventually caught and hanged in 1788. The contrast between Deacon Brodie’s respectable façade and his real nature was the inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Today there is still an alleyway off the Royal Mile called Brodie’s Close, which is where Deacon Brodie’s family lived.

‘The contrast between Deacon Brodie’s respectable façade and his real nature was the inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde’

The pub itself has been around since 1806 and is a large tavern with an amazing ceiling. You will also find a large selection of real ales and great pub food, as well as an upstairs dining room.

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